Finding a daily practice : Buddhism

Applied Buddhism is central to my life. Trying to make the philosophy a practical ‚adventure‘ and finding daily application to the insights gleaned through study and mediation – and this woman and book is a perfect guide and aid in that arduous task.

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo has changed my life over and over again.
I read her book ‚cave in the snow‘ as a teenager. Re read it in my 20‘s twice and then had the pleasure of attending a 3 day teaching at Tuschita meditation centre in McLeod Ganj in 2015 – it broke me apart and gave me a new vitality. I was in a very difficult place emotionally and she answered my question with cutting insight and compassion and told me exactly what I didn’t want to hear and needed to come to understand. I have listened to the teachings again and again on audio and they still give me so much to chew on. An ongoing journey
So much to learn.

This book is also, again, shaking me up, re orienting my focus and reminding me of the concepts and ideals I continue to grasp and then lose and test and value. I need reminding because it doesn’t come naturally.

When we’re bombarded with advertising and media and the capitalist agenda in all its manifestations we are drawn further and further away from coming to an understanding of how we can truly alleviate some of this suffering, how we can truly help ourselves and others.

A new dress💃, shiny brown legs👯‍♀️ and being able to do a handstand 💪🏼 isn’t going to lighten this heavy load we carry around and the feeling of discontent – sorry. That just isn’t the way it works, and actually we all know it on some level.

But I truly madly deeply believe that within the tenants of Buddhism there are seeds of wisdom and a structure set out for us to learn to open our hearts and minds to a way of life that is brighter and holds things lighter and brings us more moments of bliss and joy.

Sorrow is real, loss, dissatisfaction and death are real, but so is love compassion and joy.

Choose to develop a life that seeks to increase joy and compassion and for yourself and others.

Hard work to say the least, many lifetimes the Buddhist would argue, but well worth it.

 

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